Organizational-spanning characteristics of IoT Systems

mindthegap-300x223

Gaps between institutional organizations implementing & supporting IoT Systems create challenges

One of the unique characteristics of IoT Systems, and one that adds to the complexity of a system’s deployment, is that they tend to span many organizations and entities within the institution. This is particularly true in Higher Education institutions with their city-like aspects, multiple service lines, and wide variety of activities in their buildings and spaces. While traditional enterprise systems, such as e-mail or calendaring, are likely to be owned and operated by one or two institutional organizations, IoT Systems involve many and are deployed in the ‘complex and material manifestations’ that characterize buildings and spaces.

A Higher Education institution example might be a research lab that incorporates an automation and environmental control system that involves the facilities organization, the central IT organization, maybe a local/distributed IT organization, the lead researcher (aka Principal Investigator or PI), her lab team, at least one vendor/contractor and probably several other vendors. Between each of these, a gap forms where system ownership and accountability can fall. Everyone sees their piece, but not much of the others. There’s no one monitoring the greater Gestalt of the IoT System. And that’s where the wild things are.

Traditional enterprise systems tend to fall within the domain of central IT with use of the system being distributed around the institution. So with traditional enterprise systems, use is distributed but ownership and operation is largely with one organization. IoT Systems, on the other hand, tend to have multiple parties/organizations involved in the implementation and management, but the ownership is unclear.

IoT Systems are systems within systems within systems …

IoT Systems are systems within systems within systems …

This lack of ownership can lead to unfortunate assumptions. For example, the end user/researcher in the Higher Ed case is probably thinking, “central IT and the Chief Information Security Officer are ensuring my system is safe and secure.” The central IT group is thinking, “I’ve got no idea what they’re plugging into the network down there … I didn’t even know they bought a new system. Where did that come from? “ The facilities people might be thinking, “Okay I’ll install these 100 sensors and 50 actuators around this building and these two computers in the closet that the vendor said I had to install. The research people and central IT people will make sure it’s all configured properly.” No one is seeing the whole picture or managing the whole system to desired outcomes.

This implementation and management of IoT Systems is a part of what is being explored within Internet2’s IoT Systems Risk Management Task Force in support of Internet2’s Smart Campus Initiative.

Read more from the Long Tail Risk

CyberTECH IoT San Diego and IoT Seattle Hosts Joint IoT Smart & Safe Cities Meetup