WHAT TO DITCH FOR THE PITCH, START WITH POWERPOINT

The winner of yesterday’s CyberTECH Spotlight Pitch Night. was EDGEHome. It was a honor to be invited to judge the competition. I focused on form while substance was handled by an extremely talented, intelligent and experienced group of start-up veterans. including Garrett Borunda, Neal Cunningham, and Ed Lake.

EDGEHome CEO and Founder Scott Steele chose images for his slide deck. The contrast between a futuristic George Jetson image and the reality of the modern kitchen brought his point home in just two slides. It got my vote and more importantly, also the vote of my colleagues of substance.

Other participants chose text heavy slide decks (some in all caps). It cost them points in spite of the substance of their pitch.

What I learned all over again was there are no neutral slide decks. Clear images, a minimum amount of clear, readable text and smooth delivery wins, anything less should ditched.

What to Leave In.

Good Posture, Manners and Dress – I’m just saying.

Your Authentic Voice – You are the first asset investors consider.

Visual Focus – Please don’t make any sudden, threatening moves.

Fun – If you relax, we will all have great fun.

This blog was written by Jerry Gitchel

The Art of the Pitch

When I first started speaking professionally a 45 minute keynote was the standard. At the birth of TED, the model got cut to ribbons when the standard became 18 minutes. On Friday night a small group of entrepreneurs will sweat and squeeze their pitches into an incredibly tight 3 minute box. I wish them luck. Hell, wish me luck, I’ve got the pick a winner! I’ve been invited to serve as a judge for this Friday’s CyberTECH Spotlight Pitch Night.

Not being one to throw my fellow entrepreneurs to the wolves, I’m going to share with I’ve learned from my 15 years on the platform. Including the nightmare of speaking to Ms. Joanne’s 5th grade class and surviving the ComedyZone’s Stand Up Comedy School.

When it comes to presenting on any topic, to any size audience, there are three areas of focus. Visual, Vocal, Content. We’ll look at each as we walk through the three phases of Pitchfest.

Pre-Pitch

Start with the content. It’s a variable that expands or contracts based on the length of the presentation. As the duration shortens, each word becomes more important. What to leave in and what to take out also varies. Each investor has their own idea of what they need to hear. Consider asking them directly. It’s not against the rules. If they say yes to your pitch, you’re going to have plenty of serious discussions later. Why wait? Start asking questions.

Rehearse, out loud please – At first it will be too long. Type it up, print it out, cut and slash and pound on it until you are UNDER the time limit.

Once you’re close, record it for your personal review – I know this is hard, but watch the clip Hey, it’s only three minutes!

Review then repeat until you’re satisfied. When you’re done, burn the evidence.

Prepare a list of possible questions. Rehearse your answers. The trick here is to provide a direct answer, then elaborate. If asked about 7, don’t start with 1. By the time you get to 3, no one will be listening.

The Pitch

The key here is to capture the audiences visual focus. As your introduction ends, walk to the center, turn and HOLD STILL. Wait two short beats then start your presentation.

Keep Calm and Pitch On – Don’t stop, but don’t hurry. Like playing the Blues, it’s the space between the notes that count. Bracket each statement with a pause.

You can move, but only in sync with the rhythm of your voice – Speak, stop, move, speak. Focus on an individual and deliver the next statement to them. Don’t stare, share.

Never. Ever, let the timer have the last word – It’s your pitch, you need to take it over the finish line. Trying to squeeze in a few more words at the end is selfish. Finish before the time calls you out.

Questions are the most important part – Have a member of your team jot down which questions get asked during Q & A. It’s the best feedback you can get for crafting your next pitch.

Post-pitch

It’s NOT Miller time. Engage audience members individually. You already know how do did, so don’t even ask. Asking, “What did you like best?” gets the conversation started on a positive note. “What area would you have liked to hear more about?” eliminates the simple yes or no response.

Put the worms back in the can with a closing that includes a request for a follow-up conversation. Close with gratitude. Thanks for being here wraps up your pitch with a big bright bow.

I’m looking forward to working with San Diego’s finest. If you agree, use the link below to RSVP. You will be amazed!

Event Details

CyberTECH Spotlight Friday Pitch Night

This blog was written by Jerry Gitchel

THE ART OF THE SOCIAL ASK

“Should I put a QR code on my business card?”

Jenny Olding posed this question not on Google but on Facebook. She got a better answer, and much more.

SEO will always be important, but there’s a significant shift in how people find information on the Internet. It comes from the combination of social and mobile. When business professionals need immediate answers to tough questions, their first move is to reach out to their social networks from a mobile device. As a marketer or business owner, you need to be there waiting to respond to their very special invitation.

Savvy business professionals are discovering that social shouting is not only ineffective, it drives prospects away. Social listening on the other hand, engages new contacts and builds relationships.

The Art of the Social Ask

J. Summer Rogers, CEO of nPruv, Inc. finished her presentation yesterday with, “Here’s my ask.” For me it was the best idea to come out of the, IoT (Internet of Things) Start-Up Table Breakfast.The technology start-up community here in San Diego gets it. Asking questions engages prospects, investors and prospective team members.

Would you like to increase your social engagement? All you have to do is ask.

5 Tips to Improving Your Social Engagement

Pose a genuine, thought-provoking question – If your question is self-serving or self-promotional, don’t bother. Most folks on social have their BS filter on max.

Answer a thought provoking question, thoughtfully – Have an opinion? State it, but respectfully. I think QR Codes, like all technology that include the word “Cool” in their definition, as stupid. I simply shared why I thought they were less than effective. What I liked best about Jenny’s thread was the real world examples and multiple points of view.

Honor the Conversation and Contributors – I adding an update to Jenny’s thread stating clearly what I liked best.

Engage Contributors – I use social engagement to build relationships with those I serve best. As suggested by Jon Ferrara, CRM Pioneer and Founder of Nimble.com, “Walk in your prospects digital footprints.”

Close the Loop – If you start a social ask, finish it. Thank everyone, share what you decided and most importantly, your results. Handle this right and you will earn the right to ask a second question.

My Social Ask

I’m considering closing comments on my blog. I’m finding that ideas spread faster via social. If you find value here, please consider sharing it socially.

This blog was written by Jerry Gitchel, Make Technology Work